Saturday, November 30, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1348

4 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1348 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
What a terrible month for me. I feel totally drained. Where has my energy and my imagination gone to? Again and again I catch myself staring meaningless on the screen and into open books, I miss what people are saying to me. I need all remaining energy for my job. To prepare this post took hours and from my point of view it looks like I found some words and pictures which I put together randomly .
Another hiatus is no option because I know when I stop now it will be the end of the Lighthouse. I'm still convinced that my condition will change - but I do not know when. Until then I hope you will bear a book blog without reviews.



ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB



  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Who in fiction are you?
  2. Alchemy
  3. Code breaking machines
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Ad

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms

The Lighthouse

The best day for reading is Sunday. But with spending a few hours on one day it is impossible to achieve a proper progress. At least I continued to read one of my long term readings and I put my nose in a book I discovered last week. This is not my month due to two facts: Depressing weather and exhausting work. I was so happy that I finished a book last Sunday and wanted to spend more time for reading. I ended up with 227 pages in six days!!! Really disappointing.

I finished


- no book


I'm

- 286 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.
150 pages progress

- 55 pages in Shadow of the Serpent (pbl, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846971938; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2BDU] by David Ashton
You will find more information about the author and the book in the Books section of this post.



No progress

- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.


- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another
Of course I bought books and copied digital copies for free in the past four weeks. It would go beyond the scope of this post to present them all at once.


I received my paperback copy of Cold Steel (pb, 2013) [ISBN13: 978-1841498867]  by Kate Elliott which is the third and final instalment in the Spiritwalker Series.
"Trouble, treachery, and magic just won't stop plaguing Cat Barahal. The Master of the Wild Hunt has stolen her husband Andevai. The ruler of the Taino kingdom blames her for his mother's murder. The infamous General Camjiata insists she join his army to help defeat the cold mages who rule Europa. An enraged fire mage wants to kill her. And Cat, her cousin Bee, and her half-brother Rory, aren't even back in Europa yet, where revolution is burning up the streets.

Revolutions to plot. Enemies to crush. Handsome men to rescue.

Cat and Bee have their work cut out for them." [Source]


I read and liked the first book of the trilogy a lot. I'm really good when it comes to collecting series but I'm worse when I comes to reading a complete series.


I got a digital copy of Shadow of the Serpent (pbl, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846971938; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2BDU] by David Ashton for free.
"Known as the father of forensics and a likely influence on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, real-life police inspector James McLevy is here reinvented by David Ashton in this the first thrilling Inspector McLevy Mystery, Shadow of the Serpent. 1880, Edinburgh, Election fever grips the city. But while the rich and educated argue about politics, in the dank wynds of the docks it's a struggle just to stay alive. When a prostitute is brutally murdered, disturbing memories from thirty years ago are stirred in McLevy who is soon lured into a murky world of politics, perversion and deception—and the shadow of the serpent." [Source]
Where to begin? I'm a bit addicted to the Victorian era which is no secret when you follow my blog regularly.
There was no way out for me to download the free digital copy of Shadow of the Serpent after reading the description. Then I started my investigation because I wanted to know more about the author, the book and the main character inspector James McLevy. David Ashton is an author and actor. I like the story about how David Ashton discovered James McLevy.
"My hero.

I found James McLevy at the British Library in 1999; he was falling to pieces at the time.

“The Other Side,” a film for by BBC2. Conan Doyle (Frank Finlay) meets a dubious cove (Richard E Grant), who claims he is Sherlock Holmes. A veiled woman lurks in the shadows.

In the research I came across mention of an actual Victorian detective called McLevy who was one of the first practising policeman to write a diary of his experiences on the streets. The city was Edinburgh.

The requested book arrived reluctantly but at last lay before me, pages curled and yellow, gnarled cover warped and arthritic, all held together by a dingy white ribbon tied in a bow. I pulled gently on the ribbon, a puff of dust, and there was James McLevy. He and I, like Holmes and Watson, have been partners ever since.

The writing was anecdotal, street crimes McLevy solved in four or five pages, but the boundless appreciation of his own worth plus soaring flights of self-basting philosophy thrilled me to the bone. The word “anal” could never be applied to Jamie McLevy so stick it somewhere else." [Source]

David Ashton "fell in love with" James McLevy and this is the result so far:
- Nine McLevy radio play series  each containing of four episodes with a duration of 45 minutes each plus a 90 minute Christmas special in 2006! [Source]
Duration: 45 min each
- Four books
and more to come.
For me this is really impressive.
After reading the first 50 pages of Shadow of the Serpent  I'm intrigued. James McLevy is a fascinating character. Anyway I can't read the book without a dictionary because there are a lot of old words which I do not know. But that doesn't hinder me to enjoy the book which is like a real travel back in time. I definitely want to read the other books.

 The inspector is no fictional character. James McLevy was born in 1796 and died in 1875. He became Edinburgh's first detective in 1833 and served 30 years and solved 2.200 cases during this time. He published books and there are suggestions saying that they have had some influence on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Is it possible to get hand on the books written by James McLevy? There are reprints but for me they are not affordable. Fortunately I found a digital copy which contains a collection of his cases.
McLevy The Edinburgh Detective (digital, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00ANO4YB4] by James McLevy
"Edinburgh has provided the backdrop to stories of detection for almost a century and a half. In the 1860s, a few years before Conan Doyle began his medical studies at Edinburgh University, there appeared a hugely popular series of books with titles including Curiosities of Crime in Edinburgh, The Sliding Scale of Life and The Disclosures of a Detective. They were all the work of one James McLevy, an Edinburgh policeman. The now largely forgotten, McLevy was one of the first exponents of the crime genre and a likely influence on the creator of Sherlock Holmes. Like Conan Doyle, McLevy had an Irish background. He was born in Co Armagh, the son of a small farmer. Largely self-educated, he joined the Edinburgh police force in 1830 as a night watchman before rising up through the ranks to become a detective. The collection of stories in this book are based on some of the 2,220 cases he dealt with in the course of his career, wonderfully evoking the spirit of the city, and the vivid descriptions of its criminal classes as they moved between the very different worlds of the Old and New Towns." [Source]



For more information about James McLevy follow these links - LINK ONE, LINK TWO.
He tried to involve forensic   lived from 
In 1833 he became Edinburgh's first detective and




No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Who in fiction are you?
Sometimes I like to take part in surveys who are related to literature and personality. Today I came across one which gives surprisingly good results.  Try it yourself and answer the questions over at Who in fiction are you?

So who am I?
"You are Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice
Your efficient, knowledgeable and rational approach to life makes you a great asset to most organisations even if your introversion prevents you taking centre stage. People may find you reserved to the point of rudeness and, indeed, you may blame others for miscommunications before addressing the faults in your own communication skills.
You value time to reflect and digest problems even if some people may find you undemonstrative at times, but, given time, you will often come up with an insightful and apt response to most situations – and will go to great lengths to help out your friends when their sisters run off with scoundrels."
 To be honest there is a lot of truth in this answer. I would like to know who in fiction are you. Maybe you like to share your result with me in the comment section.



Codebreaking
In WW II Germany used a cipher machine named Engima. Especially Polish and British cryptologists worked on machines to break the Enigma code and they found the answer in form of the cryptologic bomb. There is an interesting post with impressive pictures over at Dark Roasted Blend. If you like to know more then read



Alchemy
To turn metal in gold. A dream dreamed for centuries. To let this dream come true has been one of the objectives of Alchemy.Did you know that Sir Isaac Newton and King Charles II showed interest in Alchemy? There is an enlightening post over at English Historical Fiction Authors. Have a look at


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

I know it is an ad but I love it.



That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

It is sad. All the sources I used to find quotes follow the trend of disimprovement. I do not want to spend hours searching for quotes.
Within the next days I will decide what to do instead.

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1347

4 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1347 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
While reading posts on the blogs I follow, I recognised that I'm not the only one having trouble to find enough time for reading, blogging ad reviewing. On the one hand this is sad and the other hand it is a kind of cold comfort. Anyway I will find time as I do not want to shut down my blog.


ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB


  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Beards
  2. Giveaway
  3. Gost Hunt in Victorian London
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Books, Flying Books, Fantastic Flying Books

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Find a teacher

The Lighthouse

This is not my month due to two facts: Depressing weather and exhausting work. I was so happy that I finished a book last Sunday and wanted to spend more time for reading. I ended up with 227 pages in six days!!! Really disappointing.

I finished

- CyberStorm (digital, pb, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00BT4QRHG] by Matthew Mather
I wrote on GOODREADS:
"Well executed disaster story with intense characters and twist and turns.
For me it was a five star book until I read the end.
Without giving away anything substantial I was a bit disappointed by the explanation of the cyberstorm. I expected more details."


- Crocodile on the Sandbank (pb, 1975) by Elizabeth Peters which is the first book in the Amelia Peabody series and at the same time the first book in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW].



I'm

- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.

"Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' most brilliant and best-loved creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her shocking men's pants and no-nonsense attitude!
In this first adventure, our headstrong heroine decides to use her substantial inheritance to see the world. On her travels, she rescues a gentlewoman in distress - Evelyn Barton-Forbes - and the two become friends. The two companions continue to Egypt where they face mysteries,mummies and the redoubtable Radcliffe Emerson, an outspoken archaeologist, who doesn't need women to help him solve mysteries -- at least that's what he thinks!
Join our plucky Victorian Egyptologist , together with her devastatingly handsome and brilliant husband Radcliffe, in another exciting escapadeWhen Lady Baskerville's husband Sir Henry dies after discovering what may have been an undisturbed royal tomb in Luxor, she appeals to eminent archaeologist Radcliffe Emerson and his wife Amelia to take over the excavation. Amid rumours of a curse haunting all those involved with the dig, the intrepid couple proceeds to Egypt, where they begin to suspect that Sir Henry did not die a natural death, and they are confident that the accidents that plague the dig are caused by a sinister human element, not a pharoah's curse.
The irascible husband of Victorian Egyptologist Amelia Peabody is living up to his reputation as 'The Father of Curses'. Denied permission to dig at the pyramids of Dahshoor, Emerson is awarded instead the 'pyramids' of Mazghunah - countless mounds of rubble in the middle of nowhere. Nothing in this barren spot seems of any interest but then a murder in Cairo changes all of that. The dead man was an antiques dealer, killed in his shop, so when a sinister-looking Egyptian spotted at the crime scene turns up in Mazghunah, Amelia can't resist following his trail. At the same time she has to keep an eagle eye on her wayward son Rameses and his elegant and calculating cat and look into the mysterious disappearance of a mummy case...
The 1985-96 season promises to be an exceptional one for Egyptologist Amelia Peabody, her dashing husband Emerson and their precocious eight-year-old son Rameses. The much-coveted burial chamber in Dahshoor is theirs for the digging. Yet there is a great evil in the wind that caresses the hot sands sweeping through the bustling streets and marketplaces of Cairo. An expedition cursed by misfortune and the daring moonlit abduction of Rameses alerts Amelia to the presence of her arch-enemy, the Master Criminal. And his is now a personal quest for the most valuable and elusive prize of all: vengeance on the meddling lady archaeologist with the parasol who has sworn to deliver him to justice...Amelia Peabody herself!" [Source]
I bought the omnibus in November 2012. I came across the digital copy while searching for a more "light" read as I failed to enjoy one of my current reads.

No progress

- 136 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.
A small progress

- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another
Of course I bought books and copied digital copies for free in the past four weeks. It would go beyond the scope of this post to present them all at once.

I like time travel and when I discovered Time Fall (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00D4WEQQ0] by Timothy Ashby for free, I did not hesitate to download a digital copy to my reader.
"“Their odds of returning alive are about the same as playing Russian Roulette with five loaded chambers -- one in six."

On a secret mission, Lt. Art Sutton’s team of US Rangers parachutes into Nazi Germany weeks before the end of World War II … and vanishes.

Missing in Action for seven decades.

2011. Sutton’s team lands on target in Bavaria. Unaware of the passage of time, the Rangers begin their operation: sabotage, assassinations and assaults on military targets. Believing the Rangers to be terrorists, modern Germany’s elite counterterrorism unit - led by unrepentant Nazi Hanno Kasper - hunts them.

Wounded and left behind after a gun battle, Sutton realizes that he has landed in a future world very different from 1945. He races against time to save his men, knowing that Kasper has given the order:

Take no prisoners." [Source]

Following book aroused my interest and maybe it is interesting for you too. It is neither epic fantasy nor steampunk nor historical fiction nor ..... It is a book  about books. Read the blurb and decide on your own.
The Rabbit Back Literature Society (pb and digital, 2013)[ISBN-13: 978-1908968982; AMAZON ASIN: B00FIP8Y6O] by Pasi Ilmari Jaaskelainen
""She came to realise that under one reality there's always another. And another one under that." Only very special people are chosen by children's author Laura White to join "The Society", an elite group of writers in the small town of Rabbit Back. Now a tenth member has been selected: Ella, literature teacher and possessor of beautifully curving lips. But soon Ella discovers that the Society is not what it seems. What is its mysterious ritual, "The Game"? What explains the strange disappearance that occurs at Laura's winter party, in a whirlwind of snow? Why are the words inside books starting to rearrange themselves? Was there once another tenth member, before her? Slowly, disturbing secrets that had been buried come to light - In this chilling, darkly funny novel, the uncanny brushes up against the everyday in the most beguiling and unexpected of ways" [Source]





No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Beards
Did you ever think about the role of beards in fantasy, mystery and historical fiction? If you want to know more about this, I recommend to read
over at The History Girls, I wore a beard while I was at university. But that was a long time ago. I got read of my beard after university ....


Giveaway
Today I want to let you know that Seventh Star Press is running a really awesome giveaway.
 For details please visit

Feel the Fire II Contest Featuring Kindle Fire HDX Now Live!


Ghost Hunt in Victorian London
There are still so many things I do not know about the Victorian era and Victorian London. I know there are many books about the Victorian era but it is impossible to read them all. Therefor I like it a lot when I discover post who tackle topics related to the Victorian era. Since I read
over at The History Girls, I know that in Victorian London people hunted ghosts. Amazing and strange!



That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

No movie trailer today. Instead I want to share with you a touching short movie. No more explanations. I hope you find 15 minutes to let you yourself be mesmerised by
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore (2011)



That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

Following quote fits to the boo I finished today. Now I need to find out which is the right medicine for my soul.....

"The books we read should be chosen with great care, that they may be, as an Egyptian king wrote over his library, "The medicines of the soul.

Paxton Hood

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave #issue 1346

4 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1346 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
While reading posts on the blogs I follow, I recognised that I'm not the only one having trouble to find enough time for reading, blogging ad reviewing. On the one hand this is sad and the other hand it is a kind of cold comfort. Anyway I will find time as I do not want to shut down my blog.


ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB

  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Vertiginous
  2. Length of a series
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Robocop

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Find a teacher

The Lighthouse

At least I found time to finish one book and just 70 pages left in a second book. I struggle a bit with reading fantasy.

I finished

- Caversham Lock (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00A3VLV68] by Michael Stewart Conway
I wrote on GOODREADS:
"This was a positive surprise!
I got a free copy of the book which revealed news for me about a specific Victorian era crime- "Baby-Farming" - in a most entertaining way.
This is the story of Detective Constable Jim Furnival and Detective Sergeant Harry Stubbs in the hunt of one of the most profilic baby farm murderer: Amelia Dyer.

I like the writing style of the author which brings the story to life. The author did a lot of research which I can confirm because I checked a lot of things.
There is much more to discover beyond Jack the Ripper when it comes to Victorian crime.

For more information I recommend to have a look at
Amelia Dyer and Baby Farming

Fortunately there are two more Furnival and Stubbs novels available and I own digitial copies of them."



I'm

- 271 pages in CyberStorm (digital, pb, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00BT4QRHG] by Matthew Mather
Gripping and realistic!
"Sometimes the worst storms aren't from Mother Nature, and sometimes the worst nightmares aren't the ones in our heads.

Mike Mitchell, an average New Yorker already struggling to keep his family together, suddenly finds himself fighting just to keep them alive when an increasingly bizarre string of disasters start appearing on the world's news networks. As the world and cyberworld come crashing down, bending perception and reality, a monster snowstorm cuts New York off from the world, turning it into a wintry tomb where nothing is what it seems..." [Source]
Gripping and realistic! I'm sure I will finish the book tonight.





No progress

- 136 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.
A small progress

- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another
Of course I bought books and copied digital copies for free in the past four weeks. It would go beyond the scope of this post to present them all at once.


My collection of books related to the Victorian era is growing. My latest acquisition is something special. Author  George Augustus Sala was a journalist and lived from 1828 to 1895. The following book has been published for the first time in 1859. That means it is a book written by a contemporary time witness.

Twice Round the Clock: Twenty Four Hours in Victorian London (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00563H2NO] by George Augustus Sala

"'Twice Round the Clock' is the defining work of George Augustus Sala (1828-1895) — a tour of 1850s London sights and sounds — one chapter for each hour of the day — published in 1859.

Sala was a prolific journalist, one of Dickens's protégés at the magazine 'Household Words': a colourful character, a bon viveur who seemed to spend much of his life on the cusp of bankruptcy. He was known for his drunken habits and quarrelsome manner. It is not insignificant, perhaps, that much of his early writing provides graphic descriptions of different examples of the capital's pubs and gin palaces.

'Twice Round the Clock' itself is something of a masterpiece. Written in over-wrought, exaggerated prose, full of Classical and literary allusions — rather rich, even by Victorian standards — it remains fascinating reading for anyone who loves either the ebullient language and literature of the mid-Victorian period or its social history. Sala himself chose to pre-empt his critics in the book's preface, damning his own work, with heavy irony, as: 'flippant, pretentious, superficial and yet arrogant of knowledge; verbose without being eloquent; crabbed without being quaint; redundant without being copious in illustration; full of paradoxes not extenuated by originality; and of jocular expressions not relieved by humour'. In fact, Sala's writing reveals not one iota of self-doubt, except submerged in his patent desire to impress and entertain the reader — a task in which he succeeds.

There are many, many gems herein for the social historian. To take some random examples, here we have Sala on the food enjoyed by Victorian gentlemen when dining out:

"See the pyramids of dishes arrive; the steaming succession of red-hot chops, with their brown, frizzling caudal appendages sobbing hot tears of passionate fat. See the serene kidneys unsubdued, though grilled, smiling though cooked, weltering proudly in their noble gravy, like warriors who have fallen upon the field of honour. See the hot yellow lava of the Welsh rabbit stream over and engulf the timid toast. Sniff the fragrant vapour of the corpulent sausage. Mark how the russet leathern-coated baked potato at first defies the knife, then gracefully cedes, and through a lengthened gash yields its farinaceous effervescence to the influence of butter and catsup. The only refreshments present open to even a suspicion of effeminacy are the poached eggs, glistening like suns in a firmament of willow-pattern plate; and those too, I am willing to believe, are only taken by country-gentlemen hard pressed by hunger, just to 'stay their stomachs,' while the more important chops and kidneys are being prepared."

Or here he describes, marvellously, the typical young foppish man-about-town of the period:

"'Swells.' I use the term advisedly, for none other can so minutely characterise them. Long, stern, solemn, languid, with drooping tawny moustaches, with faultlessly made habiliments, with irreproachable white neckcloths, with eyes half-closed, with pendant arms, with feet enclosed in mirror-like patent boots, the "swells" saunter listlessly through the ball-room with a quiet consciousness that all these dazzling frivolities are provided for their special gratification — which indeed they are."

I should note that I have toyed with Sala's text in two small ways — I hope he forgives me. First, I have moved the author's lengthy dedication/preface to the end of the book (where so many prefaces belong); second, I have added a brief explanatory sub-title, lest 'Twice Round the Clock' seem too mysterious to browsing readers. In exculpation for these changes, I have retained the forty-six illustrations by William M'Connel which graced the original.

I hope is that this digital copy may bring both Sala and 'Twice Round the Clock' the wider audience they deserve.

Lee Jackson" [Source]




No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Vertiginous
 I admit I have a problem with height not only in the real world. Even pictures make me feel giddy. So it took me more time than usual to look at all the pictures in following post over at Dark Roasted Blend
 


Series
I love to read series with returning characters who develop. A few days ago author Alex Bledsoe shared his opinion about the length of a series with the reader of his blog.:



That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

There will be a new  Robocop movie in 2014 which is a remake of the 1987 Robocop. Will be interesting to the the difference between the two movies.


That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

The older I get the more critical I get when it comes to the question to finish a book or not. In most cases I decide after 50 pages if I like a book or not. There is one exception. If I get a trustworthy recommendation that it takes some more pages until a book reveals its real reading pleasure then I skip my rule. Following quote fits perfectly to my rule ...

"A physicist is an atom's way of knowing about atoms.

George Wald, US biologist, 1906 -

Monday, November 11, 2013

Limited Offer: Get The Hurt Circuit by Sabine Atkins for free

2 comments
Dear Readers,

I know a post on Monday is unusual for me. But in this case it makes sense to post this information today or never.

On 3rd of August 2013 I posted following information:
 

News from author Sabine Atkins
You may remember that I'm a fan of  her Varangian Trilogy. So far two books have been published and I reviewed both of them:




As everyone knows good books raise the expectation for the next book, especially when it will be the final book in a series. Sabine Atkins decided to take a break from the  Varangian Trilogy and to focus on two other projects: to raise a dog and to write a dystopian science fiction novel because of an intoxicating inspiration. Now the time has come to share the first results of the latter project.
Sabine Atkins invite interested readers to read the prologue and the first chapter of THE HURT CURCUIT for free! Just click on the following link


I read the excerpt and I like the setting and the character of Calen.



Now Sabine Atkins informed me that The Hurt Circuit (November 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00GA0R4WG] has been published in digital format.
"What's inside the red metal box?
Not even its owner, Calen Firth-Shelby, knows for sure. The red metal box is all that's left from his life as the son of a mega-rich tycoon.

Now there's just one thing on the mind of the nineteen-year-old former snowboarding hot shot, girls magnet and political prodigy who came in last place on the Hurt Circuit four years ago: surviving long enough on the Baffin-Chain (a man-made prison island which is infested by cannibals) to prevent his siblings, twins Stella and Paul, from suffering the same fate.

In the not-so-far future, the mega-rich live in constant fear: the "Suburban Tribes" that emerged from years of extremely violent global riots are more or less successfully kept out of the major cities and the state-of-the-art mountain enclaves of the most influential billionaire families. But the greatest threat comes from within. First it came in the form of the catastrophic "Billionaire-Wars", now it disguises itself as ubiquitous, highly intrusive surveillance technologies, as complex corporate lawsuits/espionage - and as the Hurt Circuit.

While the super-billionaires are racing each other to expand their conglomerates beyond Earth, their teenage children are transported to middle schools situated in enemy territories, to stay there for one year as hostages. There, on the Hurt Circuit, the teenagers have to complete dangerous assignments which often result in gruesome injuries and casualties. They are also exposed to a great deal of bullying from their peers: embarrassing secrets are gleefully dissected by obscure HC councils, and the inevitable suicides are covered up as unfortunate mishaps. The winners and their families are rewarded with even more money and a worldwide celebrity-status, while the losers are quickly hidden away by their disappointed families. If they are lucky.

Calen isn't even that lucky. Tethering between life and death and unaware that he's still on the Hurt Circuit, albeit on a secret level, he breaks out of prison. However, his reappearance in high society not only triggers assassins to come after him, but also opens old wounds in family members and childhood friends.


He finds himself again in front of the ever-present cameras of the surveillance agencies and entertainment broadcasters, baring his body and soul to cover up his attempts of protecting his siblings and to defeat the Hurt Circuit.

But the Hurt Circuit never stops." [Source]

In order to celebrate the release of The Hurt Circuit, Sabine Atkins managed a free download of The Hurt Circuit over at Amazon on 11th and 12th of November 2013.

Get your free digital copy of The Hurt Circuit at

 Amazon.com
 or
Amazon.co.uk
 or
Amazon.de

Enjoy Reading



Saturday, November 09, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave #issue 1345

1 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1345 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
As promised on October 12, I'm back.  The past four weeks have been really busy. Don't worry, I will not bother you with details.
Looking back I must say it was good to have a break. But it is also good to be back in the world of books and blogs.
The remaining weeks until the end of 2013 will show if I will be able to to deliver input which satisfy me.
First an foremost blogging about books should be fun and pleasure. It is a passionate hobby for me.

ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB

  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
  2. For Time Travel Lovers
  3. A gift from Tor.com
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. SF/F/H Lists
  2. Engineering London Underground
  3. Jules Verne and his house
  4. Siege Ladders
  5. The Completist
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. "Sew What's New"

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Quote related to temper

The Lighthouse

There was not much time for reading in the past four weeks. I neither finished a book nor I made evident progress in my current reads. I hope to find more time for reading soon. 

I finished

- no book


I'm

- 136 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.
A small progress

- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson

- 63 pages in Caversham Lock (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00A3VLV68] by Michael Stewart Conway


No progress
- nothing to mention

 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another
Of course I bought books and copied digital copies for free in the past four weeks. It would go beyond the scope of this post to present them all at once.

Today arrived my paperback copy of Sherlock Holmes: The Will of Dead Men(November 2013) [Paperback ISBN-13: 978-1781160015] by George Mann

"A young man named Peter Maugram appears at the front door of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson’s Baker Street lodgings. Maugram’s uncle is dead and his will has disappeared, leaving the man afraid that he will be left penniless. Holmes agrees to take the case and he and Watson dig deep into the murky past of this complex family.

A brand-new Sherlock Holmes novel from the acclaimed author of the Newbury & Hobbes series." [Source]
There is no information about the year. Therefore I do not know if the author follows the time line from the original stories or not.
The description sounds like a " normal" Holmes case.
I hope it will be as good as Sherlock Holmes: The Stuff of Nightmares (August 2013) [Paperback ISBN-13:  978-1781165416] by James Lovegrove which I red a while ago.

Several days a week I scan the lists of free digital books over at Amazon.de and once a while I discover books which sound interesting. As they are free I download a copy and have a look. Today I show you my latest discovery. It is a series of three books set in Victorian England around 1896 and starring the detectives Furnivall and Stubbs.


The first book tells the story of  Amelia Dyer, one of the most profilic baby farm murderer.

Caversham Lock (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00A3VLV68] by Michael Stewart Conway.
 "When a parcel containing a dead baby is pulled from the Thames, detectives Furnivall and Stubbs are sent to deal with the matter. They investigate at breakneck speed- it is 1896, after all, and they have all the advantages of the modern world to help them. Using microscopes, the rail network and the telegraph, they identify the culprits- a Mrs Dyer and her daughter, Polly. Even as they close in, Mrs Dyer has been back to Caversham Lock with another victim. By the time the two women are arrested there are seven little bodies in the mortuary at Reading. Each has Mrs Dyer’s trademark white dressmaker’s tape around its neck.

The case doesn't work out as planned, however, and they're forced to travel to the west country. Despite being under strict orders to return to Reading, they set an ambush on the Clifton Suspension Bridge. But a storm is rolling in, and there is another man in Bristol – a man from the Home Office sent to clean up his superiors’ mistakes." [Source]
I started to read the book and so far I like it.

The series continues with Caversham Road (digital, 2013)[AMAZON ASIN: B00CA8J7D6] by Michael Stewart Conway
"When a young woman is found dead on an allotment early one morning, Furnivall and Stubbs are summoned to the scene. She is lying on her back, fully dressed in undamaged clothes, and yet somehow she has bled to death. A monster has come to stay in a slightly run- down suburb in a small town at the heart of Queen Victoria’s Empire. The investigation will take them into the world of hard- headed criminal business as well as to the heart of one man’s madness." [Source]






Caversham House (digital, 2013)[AMAZON ASIN: B00G4DSL9O] by Michael Stewart Conway is the third book in the series.
"Furnivall and Stubbs have better things to do when Sir Balfour Campbell's painting goes missing- especially since Sir Balfour admits the picture is essentially worthless. But Reggie Maltby, the cook's son, is also missing and a familiar face turns up somewhere he shouldn't be. Then a body turns up, and the painting is not what it appeared to be and it seems Stubbs will have to swallow his distaste and spend some time in Paris. And Mr Furnivall will have to learn to fly." [Source]



I tried to get more information about the author but I failed. Therefore I also do not know whether there will be more books starring or not.



For Time Travel Lovers
I like to read time travel stories and now there is a book which should appeal time travel fans. Since today I own a digital copy of edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer
"THE TIME TRAVELER'S ALMANAC is the largest, most definitive collection of time travel stories ever assembled. Gathered into one volume by intrepid chrononauts and world-renowned anthologists Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, here is over a century's worth of literary travels into past and the future. The anthology covers millions of years of Earth’s history - from the age of the dinosaurs to strange and fascinating futures, through to the end of Time itself. The Time Traveler’s Almanac will reacquaint readers with beloved classics and introduce them to thrilling contemporary examples of the time travel genre.

THE TIME TRAVELER'S ALMANAC includes stories from Douglas Adams, Isaac Asmiov, Ray Bradbury, William Gibson, George RR Martin, Ursula K. Le Guin, Michael Moorcock and, of course, HG Wells." [Source]

I will have a look at the content when I have finished this post.


A gift from Tor.com
There are still some weeks to go until Christmas. But Tor/Forge.com surprised owner of digital readers with an early gift.
Get a free digital copy of Some Of The Best From Torm.com, 2013 Editition
"A collection of some of the best original short fiction published on Tor.com in 2012. Includes stories by Dale Bailey, Leigh Bardugo, Cory Doctorow, Charles Stross, and Genevieve Valentine.
At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied." [Amazon product description]
over at
Amazon.com
or
Amazon.co.uk
or
Amazon.de

Maybe you have read some of these stories before. I think it is nice to have them all collected at one place.


No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

SF/F/H Lists
 What does this mean? Abbreviations are legion. In this case it is an abbreviation and at the same time the header of a page over at Dragons, Heroes and Wizards, the blog of Mulluane. She started to sample SFF blogs and websites. It is a work in progress and I find it useful.
I recommend to visit SF/F/H Lists and maybe you have something to add. Input is highly welcomed by Mulluane.


Engineering London Underground
2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the famous London Underground. There is an excellent video which gives you an overview of the remarkable work done in the past 150 years.



Jules Verne and his house

What do you know about the townhouse at No. 44 boulevard Longueville in Amiens, France? I admit that I did not know it until I read the following interesting and excellent post over at Voyages Extraordinaires:
Don't worry. The post is in English. I was not aware that hsi house reflects so much of Jules Verne books.

Siege Ladders
Who waste time to think about siege ladders? Things like this are getting interesting and important when it comes to historical fiction and fantasy. When I read about siege ladders the image of the battle of Helm's Deep pops up immediately in my mind. If you would like to get more information about castles and siege ladders then I recommend to visit Egnlish Historical Fiction Authors and to read


The Completist
Once a while I talk about about other blogs and sites. Today  I want to share with you a feature over at SF Signal. There you find the column Completist edited by Rob H Bedford. I think the author itself is the best source to explain the purpose and the content of the column:
"SFF readers can be cautious when it comes to reading series novels.  While a fair amount of us like to read the series books as they publish, a corresponding percentage of readers wish to wait until a series is published in full before diving head into what they hope to be an immersive experience.  That and the wait between volumes can lead to reader frustration and/or forgetting some of the events of the previous novel.
I’ve read a lot of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror over the years and my aim with this feature is to examine those SFFH series which have concluded. In short, all books of the series are available to be read in some format, electronic or print, but ideally both." [Source]
The latest edition is about the  series by Greg Keyes. I own all the books but never read them.
Have a look at
Furthermore Rob provided links to interviews and reviews on his blog.




That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

I'm pretty sure that everyone who is interested in The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug watched the latest trailer.


Since November 2012 I'm interested in sewing which is connected with my growing interest in Steampunk and The Victorian area. While searching videos and trailers for this post I found some really enjoying sewing videos which I must share with you.
If you live in US and you are old enough you may know the daily TV show teaching women how to sew called “Sew What’s New” from 1972 until 1994 starring George W. Trippon.
"George designed and made woman's clothing for the Hollywood studios, before and after WWII. He had a design school in Hollywood called The Trippon School of Design. His TV show, "Sew What's New", was made and aired over a period of about 20 years, starting in 1970. He wrote and published two books in conjunction with the show: "Becoming a Dress Designer: What Every Designer Should Know", and "Let's Design, Cut, Sew, and Fit With George W. Trippon". Both books are rare and difficult to find.
His partner James died in 2006. They were together for 64 years -- He wrote a book about their life together called "Ode to Jimmie". He also wrote a book about his childhood called "Pidgeon Hill" both are available from Amazon.
George pass New Years Day 2010. RIP George we love you and thanks for being you!" [Source]


I admire his sewing skills and I must say I learned a lot from these three videos. There are more George W. Trippon videos available on YouTube. Now have a look at this charming and entertaining man and his sewing machine.
Sew What's New with George W. Trippon- Making pants part 1 of 3

Sew What's New with George W. Trippon- making pants part 2 of 3

Sew What's New with George W. Trippon- making pants part 3 of 3



That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

The older I get the more critical I get when it comes to the question to finish a book or not. In most cases I decide after 50 pages if I like a book or not. There is one exception. If I get a trustworthy recommendation that it takes some more pages until a book reveals its real reading pleasure then I skip my rule. Following quote fits perfectly to my rule ...

"Never read a book through merely because you have begun it.

John Witherspoon, Scots Presbyterian minister, 1723 - 1794
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