Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1308

4 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1308 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
On Friday evening I returned from my business trip to Spain. We stayed in a hotel near Barcelona. Weatherwise it has been like the change from night to day. In Germany we had snow, wind, grey sky and temperature below zero. In Spain it was sunny and around 15 C° (= 59 °F). There was no time for reading except on the flight itself. On Saturday I relaxed and spent time with my wife instead of writing the post. I hope you may understand that. To be honest I work hard on the return to my normal posting schedule. I never thought it would be that difficult.

UPDATE!! I wrote the post on Sunday and clicked the Publish button. Today (Tuesday) I noticed that the post was still in draft mode!! I'm sorry for that.

ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB

  1. Reading progress
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New book
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Heart's desire
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. The Supersizers Go Victorian 2 to 6

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Orientation

The Lighthouse

177 pages are a poor reading progress. It is so sad when you crave for reading but you fail because you are too tired.



I'm

- still 76 pages in The Victorian Tailor (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0312642334] by Jason Maclochlainn
No progress this week

- 85 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pp, reprint 2006) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson


- 237 pages in The Secrets of the Lazarus Club (pp, 2008) [ISBN-13: 978-0141035895] by Tony Pollard

- 54 pages in Tomorrow the Killing (pb ARC, 2013) by Daniel Polansky.

- 103 pages in The Astrologer (epub ARC, March 2013) by Scott G F Bailey.




Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

During my absence I received a copy of following book which I ordered in advance.


 like to see when publisher try to push their authors by delivering more than just a review copy. Last week I received a press kit from Rhemalda Publishing, which included a review copy in different formats and a lot of additional material (interview, auhtor bio, reader's guide, press release, cover and more)!!!
The Prisoner of Heaven (pb, March 2013) [ISBN: 978-0062223470] by
Carlos Ruiz Zafón.


"Barcelona, 1957. It is the week before Christmas in the Sempere & Sons bookshop. Daniel Sempere has married the love of his life, Bea, and they have had a son whilst their partner in crime, Fermín, is busy preparing for his wedding to Bernarda in the New Year. Just when it seems as if luck is finally smiling on them, a mysterious figure with a pronounced limp enters the shop. He insists on buying the most expensive volume on display—a beautiful illustrated edition of The Count of Monte Cristo—and then proceeds to inscribe the book with the words ‘For Fermín Romero de Torres, who came back from the dead and who holds the key to the future’. Who is this man and what does he want of Fermín? The answer lies in a terrible secret that has lain hidden for two decades, an epic tale of imprisonment, betrayal, murder and love that leads back into the very heart of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books."
[Source]
This book is something special for me because it continues the story which started with The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. And this week I found following

No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere

Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

On Friday, 22nd of February 2013, author and friend of the blog Alex J. Cavanaugh revealed the cover and the blurb of the third and final book in the Cassa series. It is my heart's desire to share the information with you:

I read, liked and reviewed the two previous books:
My CassaStaR review and
My CassaFirE review which include the book trailers

CassaStorM
Alex J. Cavanaugh
(September 17th, 2013) 
[Print ISBN-13: 978-1939844002] 
[E-book ISBN-13: 978-1939844019]
 "A storm gathers across the galaxy…

Byron thought he’d put the days of battle behind him. Commanding the Cassan base on Tgren, his only struggles are occasional rogue pirate raids and endless government bureaucracies. As a galaxy-wide war encroaches upon the desert planet, Byron’s ideal life is threatened and he’s caught between the Tgrens and the Cassans.

After enemy ships attack the desert planet, Byron discovers another battle within his own family. The declaration of war between all ten races triggers nightmares in his son, shaking Bassan to the core and threatening to destroy the boy’s mind.

Meanwhile the ancient alien ship is transmitting a code that might signal the end of all life in the galaxy. And the mysterious probe that almost destroyed Tgren twenty years ago could be on its way back. As his world begins to crumble, Byron suspects a connection. The storm is about to break, and Byron is caught in the middle…"





That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

To be honest I lost appetite after I watched the second part of the video covering Victorian life. In order to get other pictures in my head I continued dirctl with part three. I think you will understand the reason for that as soon as you have watched the second part. After that I could not resist to watch the rest of the videos. So ou get them all today. Have a look whenever you are in the right mood and have some spare time   ....


The Supersizers Go Victorian 2

The Supersizers Go Victorian 3

The Supersizers Go Victorian4

The Supersizers Go Victorian 5

The Supersizers Go Victorian 5

Anyway now I know that Victorian food is nothing for me ................... except fish and chips and an ale from time to time.

That's all for today. See you next time....




Quotes
I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

There is a reason why I like maps, real maps made of paper .......


"If you don't know where you are going, you will probably end up somewhere else.

Laurence J. Peter, US educator & writer (1919 - 1988)

Monday, February 18, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1307

3 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1307 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
Instead of an apology (I found an appropriate quote)  let me tell you that the winner of the weekend is fatigue.
I'm afraid of next weekend because I will be on a business trip to Spain from Tuesday to Friday next week.
Nevertheless I tried to put together something interesting after I awoke on the sofa 90 minutes before midnight on Sunday. Unfortunately I could not finish. But I desperately want move this post online before I go to Barcelona. So I postponed the packing of my bag .....


ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost
The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB



  1. Reading progress
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New book
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Interview with Scott G F Bailey
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. The Supersizers Go Victorian 1

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Apology

The Lighthouse

189 pages are a poor reading progress. It is so sad when you crave for reading but you fail because you are too tired.




I'm

- still 76 pages in The Victorian Tailor (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0312642334] by Jason Maclochlainn
No progress this week

- 18 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pp, reprint 2006) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson
No progress

- 182 pages in The Secrets of the Lazarus Club (pp, 2008) [ISBN-13: 978-0141035895] by Tony Pollard

- 38 pages in Tomorrow the Killing (pb ARC, 2013) by Daniel Polansky.

- 66 pages in The Astrologer (epub ARC, March 2013) by Scott G F Bailey.
There is something more to share about this book.




Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

I like to see when publisher try to push their authors by delivering more than just a review copy. Last week I received a press kit from Rhemalda Publishing, which included a review copy in different formats and a lot of additional material (interview, auhtor bio, reader's guide, press release, cover and more)!!!
The Astrologer (epub ARC, March 2013) [ISBN: 978-1936850365] by Scott G F Bailey.
"“As long as Denmark looks backward, there will be bloodshed.”
It is December of 1601. Soren Andersmann, the Danish royal astrologer, has smuggled a trunk full of poisons, daggers, and a venomous snake into the royal castle at Elsinore. Though Soren knows nothing of the assassin’s trade, he has sworn to be the instrument of justice. King Christian IV has murdered Soren’s mentor and spiritual father, Tycho Brahe, the most famous astronomer the world has seen. Soren will have his revenge.
The Astrologer takes us into the world of Europe on the edge of the Renaissance. It is a world ruled by the sword, where civilization is held in place by violence and blind loyalty. The birth of science is still overshadowed by medieval religion, but men are learning to think for themselves. In 1601, a man who thinks for himself is a dangerous man. Soren Andersmann, the astrologer, is becoming a dangerous man." [Source: press kit]
I could not withstand and started to read The Astrologer and I must admit, I really like the 66 pages I read so far.


No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere

Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

The following interview was part of the Rhemalda Publishing press kit and I find it worth to share with you.

An Interview with Scott G.F. Bailey

Is The Astrologer your first novel?
No, it’s my fourth. My first novel was an experimental chunk of modernism that didn’t add up to a story. It was a real mess and it was never published because it isn’t worth reading, but it taught me that I could write something long. My second novel was a cross between The Once and Future King and Othello in the form of a coming-ofage story set in Germany, and it was a deeply flawed book. My third novel was a tragedy set in Colonial America, in 1749. After that one, I wrote The Astrologer. Every book is a learning experience, hopefully, and I’m a much better writer now than I was when I wrote my first novel. There is also something like fifteen years worth ofreading and writing between that book and The Astrologer.

Do you ever go back and look at those early novels, or at unfinished novels you abandoned along the way?
I’ve taken a poke or two at revising my first novel, but it’s hopeless. I haven’t got any unfinished novels sitting around, though I do have two fairly detailed outlines—pages and pages of notes and plot designs—for a couple of novels I abandoned before actually writing any prose. One of them was a big metaphorical thing about the dangers of the military-industrial complex, and the other was a sort of literary horror story about the devil operating a factory outside fin de siècle Baltimore. Those were both dumb ideas and I’m glad I didn’t spend more time trying to write them.

The Astrologer is an historical fiction. Did you do a lot of research in order to create your Denmark of 1601?
I did. Because it’s the Renaissance, my primary source was Shakespeare because he was alive when my book is set. I also read Saxo Grammaticus’ Danish History, Palle Lauring’s History of the Kingdom of Denmark, De Vries’ Economy of Europe in an Age of Crisis, Bainton’s The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century, Tillyard’s wonderful The Elizabethan World Picture, Alison Sim’s Food & Feast in Tudor England, as well as biographies of Francis Bacon, Johannes Keppler, Tycho Brahe, and loads of other stuff as well. I looked at maps of Renaissance Europe, I found contemporary descriptions of Copenhagen and Kronborg and Uraniborg, I read up on rapier fencing and alchemy and Renaissance astrology and science, and spent hours on JSTOR. Though no matter how much reading you do, you can still only have a patchy kind of knowledge of a world four hundred years in the past, so of course a lot of the Denmark in The Astrologer is an act of imagination on my part.

One of the ways The Astrologer captures the feel of Renaissance Europe is through the voice of Soren Andersmann, the narrator. His speech is close to Elizabethan English. How did you develop that voice?
Well, Soren is maybe speaking 19th-century literary English with an Elizabethan accent. It’s not really Elizabethan English. The touchstone for the language I used in the novel is Shakespeare, because I’m pretty familiar with Shakespeare and I think his language is just gorgeous. But you can’t really write a novel in Shakespearean verse, so I spent a lot of time modernizing Elizabethan English, making it into something a modern reader will find beautiful but not foreign. But it did go in that direction: from the Elizabethan writings of Shakespeare and Francis Bacon, turning that into something more current, rather than me simply throwing in “thinkest thou” and “mayhap” here and there. The first drafts were very close to Elizabethan English.

Do you read much historical fiction?
No, not much. I read a lot of old books, though.

But were there any modern authors you turned to for guidance when you wrote your own historical fiction?
Early on, when I was trying to figure out things like an authentic-sounding historical voice and how to work in historical references without being clumsy about it, I read Geraldine Brooks’ novel March, which was very informative. Brooks is entirely unselfconscious about immersion into her historical milieu, and I don’t think she was worried about her narrator sounding goofy. She took her project seriously, so I found that I could be serious about my own writing. Ursula Le Guin’s Lavinia was helpful, too. But really I was just trying to write a good, solid novel. I don’t think you need any special guidance for that just because you’re working in historical fiction. Good fiction is good fiction, and all of it requires solid writing skills and an imaginative author.

Do you have any rituals before you write? Anything you do to put you into a creative frame of mind?
No. I write in public, mostly, on buses or in restaurants, longhand with a pen. So what I require is a table and good light. I like to read over the pages I’ve written in my last writing session before I start in with new prose, but that’s it. When I’m working on a novel—which seems to be almost always now—I’m pretty much always thinking about the novel in some way or another. I can’t remember who said it, but writing a novel is a lot like having the bath water always running upstairs in your house; you’re aware of it constantly and you have to pay attention to it or there’ll be a real mess. So even if I’m not sitting down with pen in hand, when I’ve got a novel going, I am always writing. I’m working on a novel right now. I don’t so much believe in creativity, or the writerly mood; writing is a habit of being, as Flannery O’Connor put it. One writes. One exercises one’s imagination and puts that on the page. You don’t turn it on and off; you do it always.

What are you working on now?
Just now I’m actually working on three books. The first draft I just finished writing is a novel about my mother, or a fictionalized version of my mother. It’s very rough, and I’ll get to it after I finish revisions to the novel I drafted last year, a book called Go Home, Miss America. That’s a contemporary novel having to do with ethical choices and self image. I’m also getting ready to start drafting another historical novel about Antarctic explorers, and that’ll require a ton of reading, which frankly I’ve been putting off for a while. This fall I’ll have to deal with edits to a novel called The Transcendental Detective, which Rhemalda Publishing will put out by February 2014. So I’ve got a lot of work just now. More than I’d like, actually.

Can you remember when you first wanted to be a writer?
I grew up surrounded by books. We were a reading family, and if one of my brothers or I said we were bored, our mother would always tell us to pick up a book. At a young age I used to make little chapbooks, a couple of inches tall, with naïve retellings of other people’s stories in them. I liked seeing my name on the covers. That must’ve been the first stirrings of the desire.

So you’ve been writing all your life?
In school I liked to write stories, but they were all derivative of fairy tales or whatever I was reading at the time. But I think I had it in the back of my mind that someday I would be a writer, a published author of fiction. My writing got sidetracked during my twenties and thirties by music, and all the words got channeled into song lyrics. Later I tried my hand at short stories but I really had no idea what I was doing. I didn’t know how to write a story, how to structure a narrative. I remember sitting down and carefully trying to work out what I thought the word “story” meant. It shocked and dismayed me to realize that I had no idea at all. “How can I write a story when I don’t know what one is?” That was a pretty bleak period for me as a writer, but I worked my way through it, obviously.

So, then, what is a story?
Oh, no, I never ended up with a definition for “story.” What I did instead was start writing without worrying if what I was making was a story or not. I have a few loose general rules about writing fiction, about the necessity of dramatizing causation, the necessity of portraying people honestly, the necessity of demonstrating some kind of truth, but that’s it. I used to think that a story needed a beginning, middle and ending, but now I think a story just needs a middle. A story needs movement of some kind, be it plot action, emotional action, or thematic action. Something has to move, shift at least a little bit, even if it’s not a character. Probably it’s better if it’s not a character; probably it’s better if circumstances shove up against a character who doesn’t shift at all. That’s what Chekhov does, and what Shakespeare does in his best tragedies. Those are stories.

Have you studied writing formally?
You mean in college, or an MFA program or a writing camp? No. I’ve written a lot, and I’ve read a lot of good writing and that’s been my course of study. I’ve read John Gardner and Nabokov and C.S. Lewis’ books about literature, and Perrene’s Story and Structure was the textbook for the one fiction class I did take in college and it’s a fine book. Although I’ve read a lot of literary theory as well, especially texts on narrative, I have not formally studied writing. I was never an English major; I studied political science. Anyway, I think that the best training for a writer is the tremendous and endless library of great writing that waits to be read. Shakespeare and Chekhov are a full course on fiction. The Norton Anthologies are a full course on prose writing. Read, write, revise, read some more. Repeat until exhausted. Then do it all again.

What is it about Shakespeare that draws you in?
The thing about Shakespeare that’s so special, so enduring, is the same thing you find in all the great literature, from any culture: it is inexhaustible in its capacity to engage you intellectually and emotionally. Shakespeare— and Chekhov, James, Yeats, Dostoyevsky, O’Connor and on and on—enrich us with the experience of humanity. They are fearless and compassionate and honest and complex and truthful and impenetrable and they never wear out because there’s so much more there than even the writers were aware of. The more you work to understand Shakespeare (and the others), the more Shakespeare gives you back, the more ways you are able to see his characters, which means that the more you read Shakespeare or Chekhov, the more ways you are able to understand real people, because your awareness of humanity has been expanded. Good fiction makes readers into better people, just through the act of reading. It’s miraculous. Who wouldn’t want to read? Who wouldn’t want to be a writer? [Source: press kit]

That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

Last week I showed you four videos about Victorian English. This week I continue with my discovery of Victorian England. I found another interesting set of videos covering different areas of Victorian life.
Today I show you the first part.

The Supersizers Go Victorian 1

That's all for today. See you next time....

Quotes
I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

A good advice .......


"It is a good rule in life never to apologize. The right sort of people do not want apologies, and the wrong sort take a mean advantage of them.

P. G. Wodehouse, The Man Upstairs (1914), British humorist & novelist in US (1881 - 1975)

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1306

7 comments
Hello and welcome to issue #1306 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
First of all I want apologize for the delayed delivery. 
I thought that I'm back in the world of books and blogs. I would, if I had not been so tired in the evening after a lot of extra hours at work. I do not complain because without the job there would be no Lighthouse.
I hope there will be more time for the blog in future. So far I do not want to abandon the blog. But when there will be not enough time to deliver more then hot air ..... It seems that 2013 will be the year where I have to show a lot of endurance.

ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost
The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB


  1. Reading progress
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books
  2. Am I dreaming?
  3. A giveaway
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. The maze in my head
  2. Are the Worms really big?
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Victorian
  2. Victorian
  3. Victorian
  4. Victorian

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Philosophy

The Lighthouse

I still do not really know how I finished two books Last week. Was it a dream? I'm not sure because I found another book beside me and which looks like I'm reading that too. That sounds as confusing as I am.
FromTueasday to Saturday I read in sum 261 pages.


I finished

- Great North Road (digital, 2012) [Amazon Kindle ASIN: B00844Y4UQ] by Peter F. Hamilton

- Morlock Night (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0857661005] by K. W. Jeter



I'm

- still 76 pages in The Victorian Tailor (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0312642334] by Jason Maclochlainn
No progress this week

- 18 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pp, reprint 2006) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson
No progress

- 98 pages in The Secrets of the Lazarus Club (pp, 2008) [ISBN-13: 978-0141035895] by Tony Pollard
"London, 1857 - A series of mutilated corpses are pulled from the Thames. Young surgeon Dr George Phillips is first consulted, and then suspected, by baffled police...
Meanshile, a secret society meets. This gathering of the finest minds of the age - Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Charles Babbage, Charles Darwin and others - wish to use their discoveries to change the world...
But there are those who use the club for their own mysterious and dark ends. With his reputation and his life on the line, Dr Phillips must unmask the plotters before they unleash on an unsuspecting world an awesome scientific power..." [Source]



Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

Last week I received a copy of following book:
The Coldest War (pb, 2013) [ISBN13: 978-0356501703] by Ian Tregillis.
"For decades, Britain's warlocks have been all that stands between the British Empire and the Soviet Union - a vast domain stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the English Channel. Now each wizard's death is another blow to Britain's national security.
Meanwhile, a brother and sister - the subjects of a twisted Nazi experiment to imbue ordinary people with superhuman abilities - escape from a top-secret facility deep behind the Iron Curtain. They head for England, because that's where former spy Raybould Marsh lives. And Gretel, the mad seer, has plans for him.
As Marsh is once again drawn into the world of Milkweed, he discovers that Britain's darkest acts didn't end with the war. And while he strives to protect queen and country, he is forced to confront his own willingness to accept victory at any cost." [Source]

This is the second book in the Milkweed Triptych series which started with the excellent Bitter Seeds



Am I dreaming?
While checking my links for this issue of the Weekend Wave I found a link to a book and I could neither remember where I found the hint for this specific books nor when I copied and pasted the link. That is eerie. I read the blurb for this specific book and to my surprise, I like it a lot. I added the book immediately to my list. Maybe you will like it too or read about it.
Gideon's Angel (pb,26th February 2013) [ISBN13: 978-1781080849] by Clifford Beal.
"He came back to kill a tyrant. He found the Devil instead. An amazing historical novel with a supernatural twist set after the English Civil War. This is the stunning debut from Clifford Beal.He came back to kill a tyrant. He found the Devil instead.
1653: The long and bloody English Civil War is at an end. King Charles is dead and Oliver Cromwell rules the land as king in all but name. Richard Treadwell, an exiled royalist officer and soldier-for-hire to the King of France and his all-powerful advisor, the wily Cardinal Mazarin, burns with revenge for those who deprived him of his family and fortune. He decides upon a self-appointed mission to return to England in secret and assassinate the new Lord Protector. Once back on English soil however, he learns that his is not the only plot in motion.
A secret army run by a deluded Puritan is bent on the same quest, guided by the Devil’s hand. When demonic entities are summoned, Treadwell finds himself in a desperate turnaround: he must save Cromwell to save England from a literal descent into Hell. But first he has to contend with a wife he left in Devon who believes she’s a widow, and a furious Paris mistress who has trailed him to England, jeopardising everything. Treadwell needs allies fast. Can he convince the man sent to forcibly drag him back to Cardinal Mazarin? A young king’s musketeer named d’Artagnan.
Black dogs and demons; religion and magic; Freemasons and Ranters. It’s a dangerous new Republic for an old cavalier coming home again." [Source]

I recommend to read


In two months time The Forever Knight (hc and Kindle, April 2013) [ISBN13: 978-0756407513 and ASIN: B007P7HRG6] by John Marco will be published. It is not his first novel. Have a look at his bibliography.
"Lukien is the Bronze Knight, beloved by his kingdom and renowned in battle throughout his world. After betraying his king and losing his beloved, he wishes only for death, but rather than die, Lukien is given a chance for redemption: to be the protector of the Inhumans—those fragile mortals who live deep in the desert, far from the prying eyes of their world. These remarkable individuals have been granted magical powers in exchange for the hardships and handicaps life has handed them. And Lukien, now immortal himself, must be their champion. But how can one man, even an immortal warrior, protect hundreds from a world of potential enemies?" [Source]
You would like to get a first impression? Then read the first chapter online.
You would like to get more of the book before April 2013? Then I have good news for you!!
John Marco is giving away three advanced reading copies of The Forever Knight.
Just read The Great Galley Giveaway and leave a comment in the comment section of the blog.

GOOD LUCK !!


No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere

Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...


The Maze in my head
or
the if you get a digital review copy of an interesting book which get lost in the fast growing "pile" of digital books, returns to the surface by reading reviews and get lost again for months until it returns with the discovery of an interview with the author. Thanks to Sci-Fi Fan Letter for their Lee Collins interview.
For all of you who do not want to read the interview, I deliver the book details: The Dead of Winter (pb, 2012) [ISBN13: 978-0857662729] by Lee Collins which is the first book in the Cora Oglesby series.
"Cora and her husband hunt things - things that shouldn't exist. When the marshal of Leadville, Colorado, comes across a pair of mysterious deaths, he turns to Cora to find the creature responsible, but if Cora is to overcome the unnatural tide threatening to consume the small town, she must first confront her own tragic past as well as her present." [Source]
The second book in the Cora Oglesby series - She returns from War (pb and kindle, 2013) [ISBN13: 978-0857662750 and ASIN: B00B7A19LG] - is available now.





"Are the worms really big?"
This is the header of a guest post about how to make fantasy believable by author Robert V S Reddick of at A Fantasy Reader.
I like this kind of post interesting and inspiring.


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

Where are the trailers? I did not find one which I would like to share with you. Therefore you get something really different.
I like steampunk. You may know that of steampunk stories are set in Victorian England. I'm sure you have seen Victorian dresses and inventions. But what do you know about Victorian English? It is no secret that people used different words and also words have had a different meaning. It seems that nowadays you find a video answer for nearly every question on youtube.

It did not take that long to discover the following videos which I like to share with you today. The deliver information in an entertaining way and I promise you, that there will be a smile on your face once a while.


Victorian Criminal Slang


Polite Victorian House

Victorian Slang

Victorian Names



That's all for today. See you next time....

Quotes
I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

A good advice .......


"I have a simple philosophy. Fill what's empty. Empty what's full. And scratch where it itches.

Alice Roosevelt Longworth, US author & wit (1884 - 1980)


Saturday, February 02, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1305

4 comments

Hello and welcome to issue #1305 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
Finally I'm back in the world of books and blogs. Since 19th of January
I missed to write two issues of Edi's Weekend Wave. Instead I spent my time on our crashed PC at  home. And I have been successful!You will understand what I went through when you ever built up a PC on your own including installation of operating system and software.
My reading progress dropped to nearly zero. I don't know how long it will take to answer all the mails and to check the unread entries in my Google Reader. I does not matter as I enjoy to be back.

I hope you will like the first issue of Edi's Weekend Wave after the unforeseen break.

ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost
The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB

  1. Reading progress
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Maps, maps, maps
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. The Prototype
  2. After Earth

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idioms Visit

The Lighthouse

This a summary of what I read since January 14th. I finished three books and read in sum 770 pages in 18 days . the past days due to one reason: I have been to tired after long working days. In sum I read y348 pages from Tuesday to Saturday.

I finished

- ACK-ACK MACAQUE (pb, January 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-1781080603] by Gareth L. Powell.

- Gardens of the Moon (hc,10th Anniversary Edition 2009) [ISBN-13: 978-0593065068] by Steven Erikson

- The Time Machine (digital, 2012) [Amazon Kindle ASIN: B004XVQ73G] by H. G. Wells
It has been a great pleasure to read the original story.


I'm

- still 76 pages in The Victorian Tailor (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0312642334] by Jason Maclochlainn
No progress this week

- 133 pages in Morlock Night (pb, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-0857661005] by K. W. Jeter

"JUST WHAT HAPPENED WHEN THE TIME MACHINE RETURNED?
At the end of Wells' classic,tale, the traveller returned to the far future in search of his Eloi love. Having acquired his device for themselves, the brutish Morlocks have come back to Victorian England to feed upon docile humanity. But in the hour of England's greatest need, the legends say, its greatest heroes will also return, to fight against its total destruction." [Back of the book]
 I could not withstand to start reading after I finished The Time Machine .


- 636 pages in Great North Road (digital, 2012) [Amazon Kindle ASIN: B00844Y4UQ] by Peter F. Hamilton
A lot of criminal investigation so far

- 18 pages Deadhouse Gates (pp, reprint 2006) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson


Enjoy your weekend ....


Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

Since January 14th I received two books.

The first one is the second book in Kate Elliott's Spiritwalker Series:
Cold Fire (pb, 2011) [ISBN13: 978-0316080996].
"Only one thing is certain: when Hallows' Night comes, the Wild Hunt will ride - and it feeds on mortal blood. Cat and her cousin Bee are caught in a maze of intrigue, treachery, and magic. Everyone seems to want something from them: the Cold Mages are trying to take them prisoner, and the warlord who wants to conquer all of Europa seems sure they have a special destiny to aid him whether they want to or not. Worse, hidden powers deep in the spirit world are rising, and they are the most dangerous of all. Cat must seek allies and figure out who she can trust in order to save the ones she loves. For if she doesn't, everything will be lost." [Source]
Cold Steel, the third an final book in the Spiritwalker Series will be published in June 2013.


A big thank you goes over the pond to Shellie from Layers of Thought. She has been so kind as to send me an ARC of Tomorrow the Killing (2012) by Daniel Polansky.
"Once he was a hero of the Great War, and then a member of the dreaded Black House. Now he is the criminal linchpin of Low Town. His name is Warden. He thought he had left the war behind him, but a summons from up above brings the past sharply, uncomfortably, back into focus. General Montgomery's daughter is missing somewhere in Low Town, searching for clues about her brother's murder. The General wants her found, before the stinking streets can lay claim to her, too." [Source]
I recommend to read John's review over at Layers of Thought.



No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere

Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Maps! I really like maps. Today I have two links for you.

The first map is related to the awesome Broken Empires trilogy. The final volume - Emperor of Thorns - will be published in August 2013. Author Marc Lawrence has been so kind as to share the map he sent to his publisher Voyager.

The good guys over at Dark Roasted Blend continue there post series about maps with


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

But don't worry. All the stuff I present to you will be shown at normal speed.

Today I show you two movie trailers. It seems there will be some science fiction movies hit the theatres in 2013 ...

The Prototype is an upcoming science fiction thriller. It is the story about the hunt of a humanoid drone which escaped from a military facility. That does not sound spectacular, fresh and new. Hopefully it will be a bit more than a plain action movie. The prototype looks quite interesting with the contradiction between the high tech fingers and the odd looking head.
Don't get confused. There is a second movie with the same title!




After Earth is an upcoming science fiction movie.
"One thousand years after cataclysmic events forced humanity's escape from Earth, Nova Prime has become mankind's new home. Legendary General Cypher Raige returns from an extended tour of duty to his estranged family, ready to be a father to his 13-year-old son, Kitai. When an asteroid storm damages Cypher and Kitai's craft, they crash-land on a now unfamiliar and dangerous Earth. As his father lies dying in the cockpit, Kitai must trek across the hostile terrain to recover their rescue beacon. His whole life, Kitai has wanted nothing more than to be a soldier like his father. Today, he gets his chance." Written by Columbia Pictures

So far I did not build up my mind whether I want to see the movie or not ...

That's all for today. See you next time....

Quotes
I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

A good advice .......


"Once in a while you have to take a break and visit yourself.
Audrey Giorgi
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